Lest we forget Dec. 7, 1941

This Dec. 7 marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The unprovoked and surprise attack thrust the United States into World War II.

Imperial Japan, without declaration of war, attacked at 7:55 a.m. on a quiet Sunday morning, killing 2,403 Americans and wounding 1,178 others.

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President Roosevelt addresses a joint session of Congress requesting a declaration of war against Japan Dec. 8, 1941.

The next day, President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed a joint session of Congress, asking for a declaration of war against Japan.  Congress granted his request, with only one dissent, after deliberating for less than an hour. Here’s a short excerpt of President Roosevelt’s “day of infamy” radio broadcast:  https://www.archives.gov/files/education/lessons/day-of-infamy/images/infamy-radio-address.wav

WAR & CONFLICT BOOKERA:  WORLD WAR II/PERSONALITIES

President Roosevelt signs the declaration of war against Japan Dec. 8, 1941.

In addition to the images below, here’s a nine-minute news reel video from 1942 by The News Parade about the bombing of Pearl Harber: https://archive.org/details/NewsPara1942

california

The USS California slowly sinks alongside Ford Island as a result of bomb and torpedo damage Dec. 7, 1941. The USS Shaw burns in the floating dry dock (left background). The USS Nevada is beached (left center background). (Official U.S. Navy photograph from the National Archives)

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The USS Shaw explodes after her forward magazine was detonated by a raging fire by three bombs during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. (Photograph courtesy of the National Archives)

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The USS Shaw lies a twisted mass of wreckage in a heavily bombed floating drydock. The 1,500-ton destroyer was hit by three bombs Dec. 7, 1941, that caused her forward magazine to explode. (Official Navy photograph from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum)

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The USS Arizona, at the height of the fire following the Japanese aerial attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, Dec. 7, 1941. (Official U.S. Navy photograph provided by the Library of Congress)

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Stricken from the air. Left to right is the USS West Virginia, severely damaged; the USS Tennessee, damaged; and the USS Arizona, sunk by the Japanese attach on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. (Official U.S. Navy photograph provided by the Library of Congress)

Landscape

The USS Arizona burns after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. The ship is resting on the harbor bottom. The supporting structure of the forward tripod mast collapsed after the forward magazine exploded. (Photograph courtesy of the U.S. Archives)

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Wreckage of the USS Arizona at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, following the Japanese aerial attack Dec. 7, 1941. (Official U.S. Navy photograph provided by the Library of Congress)

downes

The jumbled mass of wreckage of the U.S. destroyers, the USS Downes (left) and the USS Cassin (right) lie in a destroyed drydock after the Dec. 7 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. (Photo from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum)

oklahoma

The USS Oklahoma lies capsized in the harbor following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photograph provided by the Library of Congress)

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Planes and hangars burn at Wheeler Army Base on Oahu, Hawaii, during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Navy photograph)

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The first Japanese plan shot down during the attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. (U.S. Air Force photograph)

Pearl Harbor remembered

Bullet and shrapnel holes from the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor still scar the walls of the Pacific Air Forces headquarters building. (U.S. Air Force photograph by Tech. Sgt. Shane A. Cuomo)

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Sailors and Marines man the rails Aug. 29, 2016, as amphibious assault ship USS Boxer approaches the USS Missouri and the USS Arizona Memorial. (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communications Specialist 1st Class Brian Caracci)

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